Biologics Approved for Treatment

As of August  2022, the following biologics are approved for use in asthma, atopic dermatitis, certain gastrointestinal diseases and severe chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps. Ask your doctor if one of these therapies might be right for you or your child.

While we provide these tools as a way to learn about biologic medications, please always keep in mind that your healthcare provider, who knows your whole health history and picture, is the appropriate person to diagnose your condition and provide you with the right prescription medication when needed.

BiologicCandidates for TreatmentHow It WorksHow It’s Administered
Benralizumab (Fasenra®)People ages 12 and older who have severe asthma with an eosinophilic phenotype.Blocks the interaction of Interleukin-5 (IL-5). IL-5 activates eosinophils that cause inflammation in the airways. The drug binds to the IL-5 receptor on eosinophils and works to reduce airway inflammation. This results in fewer asthma flares and improves symptoms.Injection under the skin in the upper arm, thigh or stomach so that the medication is delivered in the tissue layer between the skin and the muscle. It is recommended that people on this medication have the injection every four weeks, and then every eight weeks. It may be administered in a doctor’s office, or may be self-administered at home with a pre-filled auto-injector.
Dupilumab (Dupixent®)People ages 6 and older who have moderate/severe uncontrolled eosinophilic asthma, or who depend on oral corticosteroids to treat their asthma. People ages 6 and older with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis that is not adequately controlled with other medicine. People ages 12 and up with eosinophilic esophagitis. People ages 18 and older with severe chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps that is not adequately controlled.Blocks the Type 2 cytokines Interleukin-4 and Interleukin-13 (IL-4 and IL-13). Both IL-4 and IL-13 promote the inflammatory cascade with increased movement of eosinophils into the airways, causing mucus production, airway hyperresponsiveness and IgE synthesis. This drug prevents asthma flares and reduces symptoms.Injection under the skin in the upper arm, thigh, or stomach so that the medication is delivered in the tissue layer between the skin and the muscle. The first dose of Dupixent(R) is given as two injections under the skin (subcutaneous injection) in the thigh or stomach. After that, it is taken as one injection every 2-4 weeks, weeks or every four weeks, depending on age and weight It may be administered in a doctor’s office, or may be self-administered at home with a pre-filled auto-injector.
Mepolizumab (Nucala®)People ages 6 and older who have severe asthma with an eosinophilic phenotype. People ages 18 and older with severe chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps that is not adequately controlled. People ages 18 and older who have Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (EGPA). People ages 12 and older who have Hypereosinophilic syndrome for ≥6 months without a known secondary cause.Blocks Interleukin-5 (IL-5), reducing the number of eosinophils in the body. IL-5 plays a key role in the production of eosinophils that lead to airway inflammation and increased mucus production. This drug reduces asthma flares and symptoms.Injection under the skin in the upper arm, thigh or stomach so that the medication is delivered in the tissue layer between the skin and the muscle. It is recommended that people prescribed this medicine have the injection every four weeks. It may be administered in a doctor’s office, or may be self-administered at home with a pre-filled auto-injector.
Omalizumab(Xolair®)People ages 6 and older who have moderate to severe allergic asthma that is not well controlled with other medicines. People ages 18 and older with severe chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps that is not adequately controlled with other medicine. For patients ≥12 years with Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria who remain symptomatic despite H1 antihistamine treatment.Stops the binding of IgE, or Immunoglobulin E, to mast cells and basophils. IgE is a protein called an antibody. Basophils and mast cells are white blood cells that are part of the immune system and contain histamine. IgE plays a role in the allergic response to an allergen and the start of the inflammatory process. This drug prevents the release of histamine and stops inflammation.Injection under the skin in the upper arm, thigh or stomach so that the medication is delivered in the tissue layer between the skin and the muscle. It is recommended that people prescribed this medicine have the injection every 2-4 weeks. It may be administered in a doctor’s office, or may be self-administered at home with a pre-filled auto-injector.
Reslizumab(Cinqair®)People ages 18 and older who have asthma that is not controllable with other medicines.Blocks the signaling of interleukin-5 (IL-5) and prevents the production and survival of eosinophils. It reduces the number of eosinophils and in turn inflammation.Intravenous injection (into a vein) by a healthcare provider in a healthcare setting. It is usually given once every four weeks. Infusions take approximately 20-50 minutes.
Tezepelumab (Tezspire®)People ages 12 and older who have severe uncontrolled asthma. There are no limitations on phenotype or biomarkers. Blocks thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) from binding and prevents the start of eosinophilic inflammation. TSLP is a protein that is a cytokine. It is released in response to triggers associated with asthma.Injection under the skin in the upper arm, thigh, or stomach so that the medication is delivered in the tissue layer between the skin and the muscle. It is usually given once every four weeks by a healthcare provider in a healthcare setting.